Tags

, , , , , , , , ,

January 26, 2015

by V Renee via nofilmschool

If you’re going to shoot with a DSLR, you’re going to want to use a stabilizer to get those clean and steady shots. Shoulder rigs are a great option, however they tend to burn quite a big hole in your pocket.

But if you want to save some money and don’t mind building your own, this DIY tutorial by Chung Dha will show you how to do it for just $70 worth of parts from eBay. (and check out the additional DIY projects and low prices along the right side of youtube–)

If you’re interested in tackling this project, Chung Dha has provided the parts list for you:

  • 15mm Rail support baseplate: $30
  • 1/4″ Clamp for 15mm rail support: $3
  • Fotga Shoulder Pad: $16
  • 11″ articulating arm: $14
  • Sponge handle grip: $6
  • Lens Support 15mm block: $13
  • Hands-free Shoulder Camera Tripod Support (optional instead of shoulder pad): $29

Even though this rig doesn’t require a huge monetary investment to build, you will be putting your faith in its ability to support your camera. Seeing as the product description on eBay for the rods state that they are made of “metal” (uh — what kind!), you might want to splurge on ones made of aluminum — or anything other than mystery metal.

But, if you do choose the rods Dha recommends and they’re not up to snuff, you’re only losing $30 — not a huge hit to your pocketbook. And if they (as well as the other parts) can support your camera system, then you’ve got a pretty decent shoulder rig on your hands (or on your shoulder).     

If you’re interested in tackling this project, Chung Dha has provided the parts list for you:

  • 15mm Rail support baseplate: $30
  • 1/4″ Clamp for 15mm rail support: $3
  • Fotga Shoulder Pad: $16
  • 11″ articulating arm: $14
  • Sponge handle grip: $6
  • Lens Support 15mm block: $13
  • Hands-free Shoulder Camera Tripod Support (optional instead of shoulder pad): $29

Even though this rig doesn’t require a huge monetary investment to build, you will be putting your faith in its ability to support your camera. Seeing as the product description on eBay for the rods state that they are made of “metal” (uh — what kind!), you might want to splurge on ones made of aluminum — or anything other than mystery metal.

But, if you do choose the rods Dha recommends and they’re not up to snuff, you’re only losing $30 — not a huge hit to your pocketbook. And if they (as well as the other parts) can support your camera system, then you’ve got a pretty decent shoulder rig on your hands (or on your shoulder).     

 

Advertisements