Avid’s Media Composer ‘First’ is here as a FREE App!

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by Steve Dent, @stevetdent 

If you’re serious about video editing and are weighing up your software options, two choices usually pop up: Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Final Cut Pro X (FCPX). But Avid, Hollywood’s go-to editing company, just played a wild card by releasing Media Composer First, a limited version of its pro software, for the hard-to-resist price of “free.” I’m well-acquainted with Avid and have used Premiere Pro and Final Cut Pro since they launched. I was excited to try out MC First to figure out if I’d recommend it, and the answer is a qualified yes — I like it, but it’s not for everyone.

https://s.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/36c0301faabc238a08248f52bfe3d1eb/205528216/avid-mc-first-color-correction-2017-08-01-05.jpg

Avid’s Media Composer was the first widely-used “nonlinear” editing system that let you make video edits instantly and nondestructively. To suit its original feature-film and TV market, Avid developed it to be fast for cutting and allow for powerful footage organization. Nowadays, it’s a complete tool for finished effects, color correction, titles and audio, as Avid also owns Pro Tools, the standard for professional audio production.

The new free version, Media Composer First, mirrors Avid’s expensive software in most ways that count. “We’ve been showing Media Composer First to Hollywood film and TV editors, and they all asked the same question: ‘What isn’t in Media Composer First? This works just like my Media Composer,'” Avid’s Matt Feury told No Film School.

[Lots more here!]

https://s.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/c7f4061b829f63459882377f8faefd27/205529031/avid-mc-first-color-correction-2017-08-01-02-ed.jpg

 

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About Jeff Riegel, Editor

Jeff is currently a Senior Producer/Editor for a government contractor in Northern Virginia where he assisted in the creation of their media department from the ground up. Prior to that, he was a Senior Video Production Specialist and Team Lead for the Department of Defense with more than ten years of consistent production, editing, video and audio recording experience. Jeff specializes in identifying, developing and supporting new trends in visual media technology and other solutions. Outside of the workplace, Jeff created a long-form documentary about the rise of a local boxer, Tori Nelson, to 13-time world champion status across 4 weight classes. It aired nationally via the Sports Channel For Women and screened at The Alexandria Film Festival and Texas Black Film Festival. Jeff is co-producing "The Lost Clipper," a 16 year documentary about the first hijacking in U.S. history and the search for those 15 lost souls taken in 1938. Filming takes him to Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Canada, and locations across the U.S. He enjoys creating a media-marketing social networking campaign for entities such as CapitalTristate Electrical Distributors and "The Lost Clipper" and personalities such as world boxing champion Tori Nelson, Narcos personalities Steve Murphy and Javier Pena, and renowned landscape photographer Frank Lee Ruggles. Solving complex technical problems by utilizing a myriad of advanced audio-video hardware and software applications along with initiative and ingenuity, Jeff is eager to attack any project head-on. Jeff's Motto: think beyond convention...and consider it done!

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